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Anyone have a copy of the Professor Wiki.pdf ?

Posted on Poppers Guide's Forum

Topic created by dr hugepenis
on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 02:57

dr hugpenis said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 02:57...

I have been making my own poppers for years and looking to learn other at-home synthesis methods.

I saw a lot of threads referring to a "wiki.pdf" (and a poppermakers subreddit) .. It looks like the PDF was at https://nublu.maitriworks.org/images/Alky%20 Nitrite%20 Preparation%20 wiki.pdf but this link appears to be no longer good, and the subreddit is locked.

Does anyone have a copy of the PDF they could post? I am most interested in the whole blue and green color changes, whenever I got those I thought it was a bad batch and threw it out! lol

Thanks all

dr hugpenis said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 02:59...

Just FYI, when I posted the above question, the link got corrupted with extra spaces but even without the extra spaces the link doesn't work...

SmegmaSludge said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 15:30...

It's also advised to drop the acid/ alcohol or just acid solution underneath the surface of the NaNO2/alcohol or just
NaNO2 solution.

The link worked for me. The above is a quote from it. It's incorrect because it's ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY to drip the acid/alcohol mixture to the bottom of the sodium nitrite solution IF you want a good consistent popper that will preserve well.

Theory: when the nitrite forms, it's less dense and so floats to the top of the reaction mixture. If you add drops of acid directly to this newly formed top layer of nitrite, you are going to degrade your newly born popper and get all manner of inconsistenties in the final product. You won't be able to to simply wash the degradation products out with water. They'll still be in your finished popper making it go to hell sooner rather than later.

Anonymous said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 15:42...

When you sniff a good popper, it should NOT give any unpleasant or weird effects. It should not have any unpleasant off odors. It should smell clean and aromatic. If you have to ask yourself if it smells good....it doesn't. When the smell is right, it's recognizable without question.

Any weird effects would be overwhelming warming of the face, racing scary heart beat, plunging blood pressure that stays way low, spinning room, black out, staggering drunkenness AND hardly any ass relax.

There will always be a strong ass relax with still potent, pure poppers. There will be an overall pleasant sensation. The worst immediate effect may be a shakiness in the hands when inhaling heavily and a sudden reflex to breathe more heavily as if exerting oneself.

The Professor said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 16:26...

Dr:
The link is correct and the reddit is by invitation. if you are interested in support for the wiki (and a poster here has already misunderstood it) then please message the moderator for PopperMakers

The Professor said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 16:39...

smegma:
Your text, and proclivity to make multiple posts in minutes, sounds quite a bit like that loon anonymous(aka nitritespecialist
, ken Jones, John mulligan, a myriad of obnoxious and obscene makes when he wants to be an ass (you'll know him when he responds with lies, insults, ad hominem and straw man fallacies, etc
))

Anyway, for years I've been paying how important it is to keep the acid away from the yield as it builds. This is some by dropping the acid (if you are dropping acid into nitrite), below the surface of the nitrite layer.

With a slow stirring speed, each drop off acid causes a few microliters of sodium nitrite to become nitrous acid (a week acid) which floats upwards sand texts with the alcohol layer trip create yield, which floats to the surface.

Subsequent drops of the string acid will be passed THROUGH the yield, and won't deteriorate or otherwise destroy the yield.

That is NOT wrong, smegma, it's what you said, only weirded differently.

You might be confused by anon's junk posy as he tries to catch up to pepper making skills that he's been reading against for more than a decade, or you might BE anon.

Either way, it seems that you might need some sort in understanding the wiki.

The Professor said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 16:44...

Horrible typos today, apologies.

You might be confused by anon's junk posts as he tries to catch up
To proper making skills, skills that he's been raging against for more than a decade, or you might BE anon.

Either way, it seems that you might need some sort in understanding the wiki.

Anonymous said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 17:40...

Both Noyes and Vogel's state specifically to drop the acid/alcohol below the surface. Vogel states to drop it to the bottom of the reaction vessel. These are FACTS that can be easily verified with a free online google.

I have confirmed that dropping the acid/alcohol below the surface and even to the bottom is absolutely essential for reasons already stated. It's NOT optional....

Anonymous said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 17:43...

It's also not necessary to be directed to some third party asshole's site when Vogel's and Noyes formulas are virtually identical, work very well, and one doesn't risk being attacked when advocating and confirming what the professional chemists have published regarding the preparation of alkyl nitrites.

Anonymous said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 17:46...

Moreover, anyone advocating food grade sodium nitrite or alcohols that come without a factory seal is NOT advocating optimum quality control measures. Quality MATTERS immensely if you want a popper that will smell clean, have good effects and last a long time(weeks if not months).

The Professor said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 19:19...

You are sounding desperate for attention again Ken.

You evidently STILL don't understand that the wiki said, years ago, the exact same thing that you are thinking is a major discovery, and that I've been fighting against your 'willy nilly' just drop it in there approach for years now.

Suddenly accepting some of the making facts (like dropping under the surface, using temps as cold as possible) that I've been promoting for more than a decade, and that you have fought tooth and nail AGAINST? ridiculous!

Vogel and Noyes work in small batches, and for non-human consumption.

Using sulfuric acid precludes making it safe for humans, for reasons posted previously and available at the PopperMakers subreddit

This jerk will get you killed, he's a petty, small man with ignorant ideas that he's trying to foist upon all of us makers.

Perhaps if you had contacted an actual chemist and HONESTLY sought guidance in making, instead of belligerantly dismissing EVERYTHING you haven't though of, you'd not still be floundering 11 years later.

EVERY chemist you have come across has denounced you and your methods, yet you are 'the thing that would not leave"

One doesn't need to join our makers site, but a paragraph in a textbook is NOT enough information to succeed. You mock the wiki, yet the wiki mostly contains (after the first couple of paragraphs) explanatory text that describes what is happening, how to control it, and how to maintain purity.

NOBODY excepting Ken is EVER attacked or berated for their level of comprehension in the forum. Ken is lying again on that one.

You speak as if I don't care about quality, always, but particularly with regard to the Sodium Nitrite lately.

That is hilarious, since only a few week ago, you were over-the-moon with a refining technique for converting food grade powder to USP grade powder. Of course that youtube video you were watching was made by a literal crackhead (notice what he's doing in other videos, and the lack of wearing a shirt and you'd know right away that the guy is going to blow himself up eventually).

If you take the time to do it right, food grade CAN be refined and at much lower cost for DIY with identical results.

Yes, quality does matter; you say that as if I'd not thought of it before;
Trying to pretend to teach me something again I guess.

The Professor said on Sun, 6 Nov 2022 at 22:14...

copy-paste

https://nublu.maitriworks.org/files/Alky%20Nitrite%20Preparation%20wiki.pdf

dr hugepenis said on Tue, 8 Nov 2022 at 14:31...

Thanks Professor, that last link did work for me. For some reason I had copied that link with the word "images" instead of "files" in the URL..

dr hugepenis said on Tue, 8 Nov 2022 at 14:48...

Also why did the forum change my name from "Dr Hugepenis" to "Dr Hugpenis" in my first two posts..... L OL... well maybe hugpenis isn't too far off.

The Professor said on Tue, 8 Nov 2022 at 17:19...

I'm glad you got it sorted
Enjoy!

Anonymous said on Fri, 11 Nov 2022 at 23:46...

So....it's been about 2 months since I bought my reagents and all brews have suddenly turned caustic and weak right out of the pot, despite using silica gel and wine gas for my alcohol and SN. Two months seems to be the shelf life of reagents once they are opened. I don't know which reagent, the alcohol, SN or even the acid.....is the most degraded, but presumably it's the SN.

This is why I don't recommend anyone make poppers at home. Yeah, you can tweak the ratios to try to get some kind of potency once a reagent or reagents have gone bad, BUT it's never as good.

The Professor said on Fri, 18 Nov 2022 at 01:29...

Don't let this dude gaslight you about ANYTHING; he's been failing at making poppers for 12 yrs, takes no guidance from knowledgeable chemists (ALL of whom have identified his methods as incorrect nonsense).

In this post, he's even sabotaged his OWN sodium nitrite to PROVE that it goes bad quickly, e.g. in two months.

NaNO2 will NOT decompose in two months, if handled properly.

He'd rather argue that and expose himself to the inevitable toxic side reactions of his methods.

Time is too short for insanity

Anonymous said on Fri, 18 Nov 2022 at 14:01...

Thomas the Professor in grand ol Nebraska has one single goal...to spread confusion and to attack anything certain truth seekers say. Why? Perhaps he has self serving interests. Perhaps he's just nuts.

He states clearly in his Wiki file that he constantly refers to that the sodium nitrite does degrade upon exposure to O2....He suggests he's adopted a sure fire way to prevent this. I tried all those measures and they all failed.

The clear FACT is that the reagents DO degrade and once they degrade sufficiently ALL brews out of the pot are smelly toxic garbage and absent distillation, which the Professor seems not to have ever tried and certainly doesn't encourage, the popper is unfit to inhale.

The Professor said on Fri, 18 Nov 2022 at 18:01...

It must be lonely in that echo chamber of yours.

Your claims get more and more extreme, and your attacks as well, yet NOBODY had EVER, in 12 years, agreed with you on ANYTHING that you are saying.

I'm fact, EVERY chemistry that has come across your posts has mentioned the fact that you're ideas are wrong and dangerous.

Truth seeker? Bullshit!

The Professor said on Fri, 18 Nov 2022 at 18:09...

Of course I distill, it's right in the name of my prep, simultaneous preparation and distillation.

T

Refining sodium nitrite is very simple, and preserving the powder is as well. YOU are the only one blaming your powder; your recent failure after two months reveals how you had sabotaged your own prep, either ignorantly or purposefully, in order to pretend that you're failures are the ingredient's fault.

Dennis said on Sat, 19 Nov 2022 at 16:30...

I don't know...I read the Professor's link and it didn't mention distillation...maybe he's updated it???

Chemistry Guru said on Sat, 19 Nov 2022 at 16:33...

It's true that reagent quality is always checked in a professional lab. It would very difficult to test reagent quality in one's basement on every single reagent. Often times, we just toss out a reagent once it expires.

Medical labs consistently use that protocol. They use hundreds of reagents to run blood tests and when they expire, the second they expire, they are tossed. It's just factual.

PopperFactory 10C??? said on Sat, 19 Nov 2022 at 16:40...

An extract from Everett Farr's patent for making isobutyl nitrite near Quakertown, PA. He's been in the business for 30 years and makes 23,000 bottles a day. 10C = 50F

The present invention also includes a method of producing the nail polish remover. The method includes charging a vessel with isobutyl alcohol and agitating; adding de-ionized water which is 10% by weight of the isobutyl alcohol; chilling to 10 C.; maintaining a maximum temperature of 10 C.; adding sodium nitrite; slowly adding hydrochloric acid; agitating for ten minutes; allowing to stand for 30 minutes for solution separation; removing the water and salt solution; adding sodium bicarbonate and de-ionized water; agitating for 10 minutes; removing the water and sodium bicarbonate solution; slowly agitating and charging with calcium chloride for 25 minutes; removing the calcium chloride; removing the isobutyl nitrite and weighing; charging the vessel with isobutyl nitrite solution; agitating; charging the vessel with butylized linseed oil and agitating for 5 minutes; removing the solution and placing in airtight containers containing nitrogen bath and activated alumina pellets; and adding silicone.

The Professor said on Sat, 19 Nov 2022 at 18:30...

Factory:
That prep seems viable at first blush, he's cutting it very close with the small amount of water, but it should work fine. Jeff also get higher priority by going colder, but 10C isn't was bad as soon temp.

Most written preps DO work, when the ones using sulphuric acid ) the yield would not be for human use, but it'll work for diazotonation, etc.

Chem Guru said on Sat, 19 Nov 2022 at 18:41...

Yes, labs check treatment and reactant quality. When I first met Ken, I assisted to him today, based on my personal experience running a national lab's bench stocks:
Hydrochloric acid is extremely stable if handled properly, and shelf life is in years.
Alcohols need more care in handling, but if all you need is 4 methyl groups, and the storage has been anaerobic, butanol, for example, well be viable for at least a year.
Sodium nitrite does oxidize, but very slowly.

When I first met Ken, he was scooping it out of a plastic ziplock bag, and trying to avoid clumps or pulling from the center of the bag; of course it would go bad quickly. After blaming the ingredients one by one, over the years, he's come around to the powder again as his problem. This time he sabotaged his own powder and it went down in two months, ridiculous, but it confirmed in his mind that he found the culprit.

The Professor said on Sat, 19 Nov 2022 at 18:43...

Chem Guru,
This should be the post above, that I accidently posted in your name, apologies

The Professor said on Sat, 19 Nov 2022 at 18:50...

Dennis,

The wiki is an explanation and exploration of salty nitrite preparation, with a focus on DIY procedures (minimizing expense and exposure to harm is emphasized).

The prep I personally undergo happens in the vapor phase instead of liquid, and requires more expensive and potentially dangerous equipment.

The NUBLU prep is essentially a slight modification of an SDE extraction, and provides triple nine purity at the output.

Anonymous said on Thu, 24 Nov 2022 at 18:25...

OMG......I took a cue off the Farr Patent and used much less water....no added water in fact....and warmer temps and I've been getting an isopropyl nitrite that is absolutely amazing.....and much easier and cheaper to make. No wretched side effects either. Good mild citrus like odor with no trace of bitterness or excess sweetness.

20 mls Equate 70% isopropyl alcohol
Add 10 grams Consolidated Chemical SN
Add 7 to 8 mls Sunnyside muriatic slowly with constant mixing. Nothing is super cold...only chilled 45 to 50F.

Wash and neutralize...dry....and bottle dry with a bit of Activated Alumina and Kcarb.

The ass/prostate effects are out of this world.

Anonymous said on Sun, 27 Nov 2022 at 07:25...

From Sciencemadness Wiki
Isopropyl nitrite
Isopropyl nitrite separatory funnel by Doug's Lab.png
Freshly prepared isopropyl nitrite
Names
IUPAC name
2-Propyl nitrite
Other names
1-Methylethyl nitrite
Isopropyl alcohol nitrite
Nitrous acid, isopropyl ester
Properties
Chemical formula
C3H7NO2
(CH3)2CHONO
Molar mass 89.09 g/mol
Appearance Straw yellow liquid
Odor Sweet
Density 0.8684 g/cm3
Melting point −132 C (−206 F; 141 K) [1]
Boiling point 40 C (104 F; 313 K)
Solubility in water
Insoluble
Solubility Miscible with acetone, diethyl ether, ethanol
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Flash point -29 C (-20.2 F; 244 K)
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
LD50 (Median dose)
300 mg/kg (mouse, oral)
3,200 mg/kg (rabbit, oral)
980 mg/kg (rat, oral)[2]
Related compounds
Related compounds
Ethyl nitrite
Isobutyl nitrite
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 C [77 F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references
Isopropyl nitrite is a highly flammable organic ester. It has the general formula (CH3)2CHONO.

Contents
1 Properties
1.1 Chemical
1.2 Physical
2 Availability
3 Preparation
4 Projects
5 Handling
5.1 Safety
5.2 Storage
5.3 Disposal
6 References
6.1 Relevant Sciencemadness threads
Properties
Chemical
Isopropyl nitrite reacts with hydrazine hydrate and sodium hydroxide to form sodium azide.

Physical
Isopropyl nitrite is straw yellow color and has a sweet, pleasant smell. It is immiscible and less dense than water. Isopropyl nitrite has a very high vapor pressure and a low boiling point, although it will decompose on boiling to produce nitrogen oxides and isopropanol. A low flash point combined with the high vapor pressure means it is very easy to ignite.

Availability
Isopropyl nitrite was available as the main active ingredient in some types of "poppers" (along with amyl nitrite), but it's harder to get hold of in recent years. In some countries, the sale of amyl nitrites may be be restricted or illegal.

It's better made in a home lab setting.

Preparation
Concentrated hydrochloric acid is slowly dripped onto sodium nitrite suspended in isopropanol, generating nitrous acid which reacts with the alcohol. The concentration of isopropanol should be less than 100% to ensure the solution does not get too acidic (which will rapidly decompose the ester) and that some of the precipitate byproducts dissolve. Diluted sulfuric acid can also be used but this will result in a larger amount of precipitate due to sodium sulfate's lower solubility compared to sodium chloride.[3][4]

Every reagent should be as cold as possible to limit decomposition to nitrogen oxides. An ice bath may be needed.

To limit exposure to this compound, the reaction is often conducted in a separatory funnel, which can be easily closed to limit vapors, and is also a convenient way of removing the aqueous layer.

Projects
Make sodium azide
Antidote for hydrogen sulfide and cyanide poisonings
Handling
Safety
As well as being highly flammable, being an organic nitrite it promotes vasodilation in the body, pushing more blood to the brain. Hence breathing fumes of isopropyl nitrite can have some mild strange side effects that mostly end up in a headache. Proper ventilation is required when using this compound.

In case of nitrite poisoning, small dosages of methylene blue are recommended (0.1 ml of 1% solution per kilogram of patient's weight, intravenously). Not to be confused with large dosages, which are toxic in the same way nitrites are, and are used to treat poisoning with blood agents like cyanides, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide (isopropyl nitrite itself can work as an antidote in these cases).

Storage
Storage is best done in a cold place such as a fridge or freezer, but care must be taken to prevent as the vapors travel quickly and can easily find a source of ignition.

If care is taken to make sure the ester does not contain any acid before storage, it will not quickly decompose and may be stored cold for many months. Anhydrous calcium chloride is often added to keep the compound dry, as prolonged exposure to water may cause hydrolysis.

Disposal
Acid hydrolysis of the compound destroys it quickly, with the evolution of nitrogen oxides. It is recommended to either burn it or simply let it evaporate over pouring it down a sink, as its solvent properties may adversely affect a plumbing system.

References
R. F. Grant and D. W. Davidson, J. Chem. Phys. 33, 1713 (1960), Dielectric Study of Some Liquid Alkyl Nitrites
http://www.chemblink.com/MSDS/MSDSFiles/541-42-4_Clear%20Synth.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbmpmLjfkkM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipqSn0nnZBU
Relevant Sciencemadness threads
Isopropyl nitrite synthesis
Categories: Articles containing unverified chemical infoboxesChemical compoundsOrganic compoundsNitritesAlkyl nitritesVolatile chemicalsEsters of inorganic acidsPsychoactive substancesLiquids
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Anonymous said on Sun, 27 Nov 2022 at 07:29...

The previous text from ScienceMadness.org states to limit the amount of added water, but to make sure the alcohol has "some" water. I found 70% isopropyl alcohol and 32% HCl allowed for enough water. The SN does NOT need any more water.

I have not tried calcium chloride yet....it's sold in home centers as a salt to de-ice sidewalks. It's likely not pure and may not be anhydrous enough. It also sucks up residual alcohol in addition to water....Everett Farr used it in his patent.

The Professor said on Sun, 27 Nov 2022 at 23:55...

1. consolidated chemical doesn't sell NaNO2; liar
2. Calcium chloride CANNOT be safely used to to 'suck up' residual alcohol; combination of blatant lie and misunderstanding

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